CIA and gang stalking: former senior level agent John Sipher talks about “sonic weapons” attacks in Cuba and around the world, misses the boat on “third party punishment.”

Gang stalking for journalists, psychologists, sociologists, and criminologists

The most common mistake that any agent–from any agency anywhere–can make about the perpetration of strange or bizarre or illegal events is to approach data from political perspective, or to blame the “common enemies,” because in spook word, sometimes its “our common allies and friends” that could be the cause agents of said events.

During my time overseas, I have had personal experience with several of these “attacks.” In the 1980s and 1990s, the Soviet and then Russian intelligence services deployed doses of nitrophenyl pentaden (NPPD) against American diplomats whom they suspected of managing espionage operations against Russian interests. This so-called “spy dust” was an invisible electromagnetic powder with a customized chemical identifier. It was smeared onto door handles, furniture and cars of suspected American spy handlers. It was a tagging agent used by Russian security elements to covertly monitor their own community by revealing unreported (and potentially espionage related) contacts between Russian and American officials. It was somewhat ingenious.

John Sipher, former senior level CIA agent

SO when analyzing the Cuba Sonic Attacks, aka “health attacks,” one former CIA agent advises that we remain skeptical of the common narrative, while also talking us through the variety of purely bizarre activities that one encounters in the covert life. And equally, that exact agent reveals his own shortsightedness, or deliberate bias by sticking with the narrative that “Russia did it,” while skipping over other third parties who had and have many tactical reasons for why they would want to do these things, regardless of the US politics.

So, have a good read through some stuff from spook world, and note how the activity herein mirrors the claims of “targeted individuals” in every way.

Then, we follow that trail, we find equally interesting commentary on Pastebin (follow the link below, as I am having an Iframe problem right now):

https://pastebin.com/embed_iframe/PYHcpsrw

From that Pastebin:

John Sipher, former CIA leaderhsip guy, says cuba attacks probably just malfunctioning survelliance equipment   

…There has been no shortage of theories as to the reasons for the attacks, some speculating that it was payback against specific individuals, a possible operation by third parties (the Russians?) to drive a wedge between the U.S. and Cuba,  

…Why don’t I believe this was an attack intended to harm diplomats?   First, I don’t think the timing or diplomatic atmosphere accords with such hostile action by the Cuban government. U.S. and Canadian diplomats reported their symptoms in the fall of 2016. At that time, the Obama Administration had relaxed diplomatic relations with Cuba   

a lapse in reasoning for Sipher? says in same article could be third party stirring shit, then cites as reason to not believe intended to harm diplomats since “diplomatic atmosphere” between Cuba and U.S. friendly at that time.  In most of his other writings, Sipher disposed to blame Russia for everything:  

 https://twitter.com/john_sipher/status/971003146570027008 John Sipher ‏Verified account @john_sipher Mar 6  

So, for psychologists who wish to protect their reputations, and journalists who seek to report on “gang stalking” keep in mind that most of it is straight out of spook world, and that the activity that your parient/source/other describes will indeed be “bizarre” at times. Keep an open mind, and test the validity of their claims, and you will see that gang stalking is not all that mysterious, once you know where to look, and how to interpret narratives.

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